A Violent New Continent

"Birth was the death of him." - Samuel Beckett

projectkr:

This movie was a experience

(Source: cloudfan, via towritelesbiansonherarms)

thewhitedenzel:

This is so good!

(Source: exploitastic, via towritelesbiansonherarms)

pixography:

Takato Yamamoto

pixography:

Takato Yamamoto

(Source: iamthebadwolf-girl, via tushbutt)

Alright

Chicken is in the oven, computer is working again, and the new GoT episode is running. 

All is well in the kingdom.

brightwalldarkroom:

"Anderson describes The Royal Tenenbaums as a film about people who peaked early, whose best years are perhaps past.  In a way, the movie interrogates the implications: childhood and genius are two cherished states in Western art and culture.  Both seem to offer a less fractured sense of self; to allow one to conquer what might otherwise be unbearable; to be celebrated for achievements and indulged in unruly behaviors.
But the Tenenbaums’ genius is more coping mechanism than gift.  Royal is a pathological father – negligent toward Chas and his adopted daughter Margot, doting upon Richie only until his failure on the tennis court.  Royal possesses the same childish vendettas and selfish goals as Rushmore’s Max Fischer.  His wounded children seem to have been formed in reaction, elaborating their own intense interests and abilities to remedy his neglect.”
—Karina Wolf on The Royal Tenenbaums, "Les Enfants Terribles" (Bright Wall/Dark Room Magazine, Issue #11, April 2014)

brightwalldarkroom:

"Anderson describes The Royal Tenenbaums as a film about people who peaked early, whose best years are perhaps past.  In a way, the movie interrogates the implications: childhood and genius are two cherished states in Western art and culture.  Both seem to offer a less fractured sense of self; to allow one to conquer what might otherwise be unbearable; to be celebrated for achievements and indulged in unruly behaviors.

But the Tenenbaums’ genius is more coping mechanism than gift.  Royal is a pathological father – negligent toward Chas and his adopted daughter Margot, doting upon Richie only until his failure on the tennis court.  Royal possesses the same childish vendettas and selfish goals as Rushmore’s Max Fischer.  His wounded children seem to have been formed in reaction, elaborating their own intense interests and abilities to remedy his neglect.”

—Karina Wolf on The Royal Tenenbaums, "Les Enfants Terribles" (Bright Wall/Dark Room Magazine, Issue #11, April 2014)

(Source: lissetfsf, via callofkathulhu)